Home DNC Texas Democrats Fail To Support The People’s Platform

Texas Democrats Fail To Support The People’s Platform

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Keep reading for Sheila Jackson's scorecard
Keep reading for Sheila Jackson's scorecard

The Democratic Party is supposed to be the party of the left. It’s supposed to be the party of progressives. It’s supposed to be the party of FDR. It’s supposed to be the party of the working class. Even in Texas, a state said to be one of the most conservative in the country, a solid 59% of the Democratic Party’s primary voting base identified as ‘liberal’ in the 2016 presidential primary.

It’s true that larger numbers of Americans self-identify as ‘conservative’ or ‘moderate’ than as liberal. However, If you actually dig into the issues, poll by poll, American people are generally center left. The right consistently berates the Democratic Party as “socialist.” If democratic legislators are so left, one would expect them to throw their support behind progressive legislation.

Our Revolution, a non-profit, 501(c)4, aimed at championing progressive legislation, compiled a list of eight bills which are currently introduced in the house. Members of the Texas Democratic Party have largely failed to throw their support behind these bills, with an aggregate cosponsorship rate of 25%. If you’re a progressive, these bills are mostly common sense legislation. They do have some problems (mainly that they don’t go far enough) – but they would still be monumental leaps forward from what we currently have in place.

H.R. 676– the Medicare For All Act. This bill would make universal healthcare coverage a reality by expanding Medicare coverage to everyone under the age of sixty five. It should be noted, Beto O’Rourke does have a valid critique of this bill: it doesn’t reimburse for-profit healthcare establishments. It’s difficult to know how big of a hole this would leave in the healthcare system without a CBO estimate. It could be large, or it could be small.

H.R.1880 – College for All Act of 2017. This bill would eliminate college tuition for those coming from households making less than $125,000.00 a year. This bill could be improved by simply eliminating college tuition from all income brackets. The cost of room and board also needs to be accounted for.

H.R. 15–  Raise the Wage Act. This bill would make the minimum wage a living wage. The living wage would be adjusted to $15.00/hour over the course of seven years. What’s lacking from this bill is adjusting the living wage based off of inflation. It would also be appropriate to perhaps adjust the living wage based off of the cost of living in each area. $15.00/hr would be adequate in most rural areas, but it wouldn’t get you very far in states like Hawaii, California, or New York.

H.R. 771 – Equal Access to Abortion Coverage in Health Insurance. Twenty five states currently prohibit insurance plans from covering abortion services. Due to the Hyde amendment, Federal funds may not be used to fund abortion services. This bill would effectively end both of these measures. The bill could be improved by enacting measures to prevent states from implementing draconian restrictions on providers like Planned Parenthood.  

H.R. 2840 –  Automatic Voter Registration Act. This bill requires states to give citizens the opportunity to register to vote when they get a driver’s license (or other state identification). This bill could be improved by taking measures to end gerrymandering, and getting ‘big money’ out of politics.

H.R. 3227 – Justice is Not For Sale Act of 2017. This bill would eliminate the use of private prisons, and reform some sentencing guidelines. This bill could be improved by federally legalizing recreational marijuana, retroactively giving non-violent drug offenders clean criminal records, and preventing non-violent drug offenders from becoming entrenched in the criminal justice system in the future. 

H.R. 1144 – Inclusive Prosperity Act of 2017. This bill would enact a tax on wall street transactions for individuals making more than $50,000  annually  ($75,000 for married couples filing a joint return). This bill could be improved by taking measures to close loopholes in the corporate income tax. To put into perspective how big of a problem this is, consider the fact that twenty six companies (all of whom made large profits) of Fortune 500 companies paid no federal income taxes from 2008 to 2012.

H.R. 2242 – Keep It In The Ground Act of 2017. This bill would end new leases on federal lands, as well as the coast of the United States. In order for this bill to work as intended, it also needs to fund the widespread development of green energy.

Without further ado, here is each congressperson’s People’s Platform scorecard.

Eddie Bernice Johnson (Tx 30th) represents most of southern Dallas county, as well as most of the southern central, and eastern portions of the city of Dallas. Her phone numbers are 202-225-8885 and 214-922-8885. Further contact information can be found here.
Eddie Bernice Johnson (Tx 30th) represents most of southern Dallas county, as well as most of the southern central, and eastern portions of the city of Dallas. Her phone numbers are 202-225-8885 and 214-922-8885.
Sheila Jackson Lee (Tx -18th) represents downtown, midtown, the third, fourth, and fifth wards, portions of the heights, portions of northeastern, northwestern, and eastern Houston, as well as portions of northern Harris county. Her phone numbers are 202-225-3816, 713-691-4882, 713-227-7740, 713-861-4070, and 713-665-0050. Further contact information can be found here.
Sheila Jackson Lee (Tx -18th) represents Downtown, Midtown, the third, fourth, and fifth wards, portions of the Heights, portions of northeastern, northwestern, and eastern Houston, as well as portions of northern Harris County. Her phone numbers are 202-225-3816, 713-691-4882, 713-227-7740, 713-861-4070, and 713-665-0050.
Gene Green (Tx - 29th) represents most of eastern Houston, Pasadena, and portions of northern Houston and Aldine. His phone numbers are 202-225-9903, 713-330-0761, and 281-999-5879. Further contact information can be found here.
Gene Green (Tx – 29th) represents most of eastern Houston, Pasadena, and portions of northern Houston and Aldine. His phone numbers are 202-225-9903, 713-330-0761, and 281-999-5879.
Marc Veasay (Tx -29th) represents portions of eastern and central Fort Worth, portions of western Dallas, and some of the suburbs between the two. His phone numbers are 202-225-9897, 212-741-1387, and 817-920-9086. Further contact information can be found here.
Marc Veasay (Tx -29th) represents portions of eastern and central Fort Worth, portions of western Dallas, and some of the suburbs between the two. His phone numbers are 202-225-9897, 212-741-1387, and 817-920-9086.
LLoyd Doggett (tx 35th) represents most of southern and portions of central Travis county, portions of Hays, Caldwell, Comal, and Bexar county along i-35. His phone numbers are 202-225-4865, 512-916-8621, and 210-704-1080. Further contact information can be found here.
LLoyd Doggett (tx 35th) represents most of southern and portions of central Travis county, portions of Hays, Caldwell, Comal, and Bexar county along i-35. His phone numbers are 202-225-4865, 512-916-8621, and 210-704-1080.
Joaquin Castro (Tx - 20th) represents most of western San Antonio, and portions of northwestern Bexar county. His phone numbers are 202-225-3236, and 210-348-8216. Further contact information can be found here.
Joaquin Castro (Tx – 20th) represents most of western San Antonio, and portions of northwestern Bexar county. His phone numbers are 202-225-3236, and 210-348-8216.
Al Green (Tx - 9th) represents portions of south and southwest Harris county, as well as portions of northeast Fort Bend county. His phone numbers are 202-225-7508, and 713-383-9234. Further contact information can be found here.
Al Green (Tx – 9th) represents portions of south and southwest Harris county, as well as portions of northeast Fort Bend county. His phone numbers are 202-225-7508, and 713-383-9234.
Beto O’Rourke (Tx - 16th) represents the city of El Paso, and most of El Paso County. O’rourke is currently also campaigning against Ted Cruz for the Senate. His phone numbers are 202-225-4831, and 915-541-1400. Further contact information can be found here.
Beto O’Rourke (Tx – 16th) represents the city of El Paso, and most of El Paso County. O’rourke is currently also campaigning against Ted Cruz for the Senate. His phone numbers are 202-225-4831, and 915-541-1400.
Vicente González (Tx - 29th) represents the counties of Brooks, Jim Hogg, Duval, Live Oak, Karnes, Guadalupe, the eastern portion of Wilson county, most of the northern, central, and south-central portions of Hidalgo county. His phone numbers are 202-225-2531, 888-217-0261, and 956-682-5545, Further contact information can be found here.
Vicente González (Tx – 29th) represents the counties of Brooks, Jim Hogg, Duval, Live Oak, Karnes, Guadalupe, the eastern portion of Wilson county, most of the northern, central, and south-central portions of Hidalgo county. His phone numbers are 202-225-2531, 888-217-0261, and 956-682-5545.
Vela Filemon represents the counties of Cameron, Willacy, Kenedy, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Bee, Goliad, Dewitt, as well as portions of the counties of San Patricio, Hidalgo, and Gonzales. His numbers are 202-225-9901, 361-230-9776, 956-544-8352, 956-276-4497, 956-520-8273. Further contact information can be found here.
Vela Filemon represents the counties of Cameron, Willacy, Kenedy, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Bee, Goliad, Dewitt, as well as portions of the counties of San Patricio, Hidalgo, and Gonzales. His numbers are 202-225-9901, 361-230-9776, 956-544-8352, 956-276-4497, 956-520-8273.
Representative Henry Cuellar (Tx - 28th) represents the counties of Starr, Zapata, Webb, McMullen, Atascosa, southern La Salle county, southwestern Hidalgo county, portions of Wilson county, and portions of southern and eastern Bexar county. His phone numbers are 202-225-1640, 956-725-0639, 956-424-3942, 956-487-5603, and 210-271-2851. Further contact information can be found here.
Representative Henry Cuellar (Tx – 28th) represents the counties of Starr, Zapata, Webb, McMullen, Atascosa, southern La Salle county, southwestern Hidalgo county, portions of Wilson county, and portions of southern and eastern Bexar county. His phone numbers are 202-225-1640, 956-725-0639, 956-424-3942, 956-487-5603, and 210-271-2851.
Aggregate Cosponsorship Scorecard for Texas’ Democratic Congressional Representatives
Aggregate Cosponsorship Scorecard for Texas’ Democratic Congressional Representatives


If you wonder who your congressional representative is, you can find that out here.

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12 COMMENTS

  1. Very disappointing article. Some of the strongest Dems in Texas have been waylaid over sponsorship vs. record of voting.
    Dems in Texas fight for every single vote they get. Maybe it is time for the “journalist” that wrote this article to actually speak to those members that were attacked and gain a better understanding of Texas politics.

  2. Co-sponsoring a bill is different than supporting it or voting for it. Is this article written to intentionally mislead? If not, please make that clear. When you say you “scorecard” people assume it means voting record.

    • No Ma’am. No intention of misleading anyone. The point of the People’s Platform is to push Democrats to fight harder for progressive legislation.

      All of us are aware that given the current political climate, the chances of us passing this legislation is zero. Because this legislation will not be brought to the floor for a vote, the closest thing Democrats can do to demonstrate their support is co-sponsor the legislation.

    • I agree. I called Veasey’s office in Grand Prairie, and they didn’t know the answers! Said to call D.C.

  3. I am a Texan Who is active in the Democratic Party and my tepresentive is on this list. He reaches out to us all the time (his constituants) to ensure he is representing “the people” who live here. So are we going “breitbart” here? Are Texas leaders expected to cosponsor every bill your group writes or what their constituents want them to focus on? And if any of these bills make it out of committee to a floor vote wil and they support it by their vote will you be eating crow or find something else to attack them
    For?

Comments are closed.